WBC Symposium at 2018 IPM Symposium

WBC Symposium at the 2018 International IPM Symposium

A symposium titled "Knowledge and tools to combat western bean cutworm: an emergent and adaptive pest in North American maize" was held on 21 March 2018 at the 9th International IPM Symposium in Baltimore, MD. The goals of the symposium were to 1) improve understanding of the IPM issues surrounding WBC and 2) increase collaborations among multistate research and extension communities by bringing together and sharing knowledge, skills, and tools to increase adoption of effective IPM practices for WBC. The symposium program included six invited presentations and a concurrent poster and extension materials session, and involved WBC researchers from across the United States, Canada, and Mexico. During the poster and extension materials sections, several participants were interviewed by Rosemary Hallberg, Communications Director at the Southern Region IPM Center in Raleigh, NC.

Presentations

1. Western bean cutworm, its movement into the Great Lakes States and impact on corn and dry bean pest management

Fred Springborn1 and Christina D. DiFonzo2 1MSU Extension, Michigan State University, Stanton, MI 2Department of Entomology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI

Western Bean Cutworm slideshow
Video of Fred Springborn's Presentation

2. Management of western bean cutworm in Ontario, Canada

Jocelyn Smith, Victor Limay-Rios, Yasmine Farhan, David Hooker, and Art Schaafsma
University of Guelph Ridgetown Campus, Guelph, Ontario, Canada

Western Bean Cutworm slideshow by Jocelyn Smith
Video of Jocelyn Smith's Presentation

3. Dynamics of EIL and ET of western bean cutworm as a function of larval survival, corn market value, and management cost

Silvana V. Paula-Moraes1, Thomas E. Hunt2, Robert J. Wright3, and Antonio R. Moraes Jr.4
1Entomology & Nematology Department, West Florida Research and Education Center, IFAS University of Florida, Jay, FL
2Department of Entomology, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Haskell Agricultural Laboratory, Concord, NE
3Department of Entomology, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, NE
4Department of Agriculture Economics, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, NE

Western Bean Cutworm slideshow by Silvana Paula-Moreas
Video of Silvana Paula-Moreas' Presentation

4. Biological responses of western bean cutworm to chemical and transgenic management

Débora G. Montezano1, Thomas E. Hunt2, Priscila M. Colombo da Luz3, Dariane Souza1, Bruno Vieira4, Greg Kruger4, and Julie A. Peterson3
1Department of Entomology, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, NE
2Department of Entomology, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Haskell Agricultural Laboratory, Concord, NE
3Department of Entomology, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, West Central Research and Extension Center, North Platte, NE
4Department of Agronomy and Horticulture, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, West Central Research and Extension Center, North Platte, NE

Debora Montezano Title Slide
Video of Débora Montezano's Presentation

5. Monitoring Cry1Fa toxin resistance levels among western bean cutworm populations

Brad S. Coates1, Yangzhou Wang1,2, Sarah N. Zukoff3, Tom E. Hunt4, and Julie A. Peterson5
1USDA-ARS, Corn Insects & Crop Genetics Research Unit, Ames, IA
2Jilin Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Changchun, China
3Department of Entomology, Kansas State University, Southwest Research and Extension Center, Garden City, KS
4Department of Entomology, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Haskell Agricultural Laboratory, Concord, NE
5Department of Entomology, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, West Central Research and Extension Center, North Platte, NE

Brad Coates Title Slide
Video of Brad Coates's Presentation

6. Harnessing the power of predators and parasitoids to incorporate biological control into western bean cutworm IPM

Julie A. Peterson1, Westen R. Archibald1,2, Jeffrey D. Bradshaw3, Débora G. Montezano4, Priscila Colombo da Luz1, Katharine A. Swoboda Bhattarai1, and Robert J. Wright4
1Department of Entomology, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, West Central Research and Extension Center, North Platte, NE
2Current affiliation: Medical Service Corp, US Navy, Norfolk, VA
3 Department of Entomology, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Panhandle Research and Extension Center, Scottsbluff, NE
4Department of Entomology, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, NE

Julie Peterson Title Slide
Video of Julie Peterson's Presentation

Poster Session

1. Dispersal and avoidance behavior of western bean cutworm when exposed to Bt maize

Débora G. Montezano1, Priscila M. Colombo da Luz2, Thomas E. Hunt3, and Julie A. Peterson2
1Department of Entomology, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, NE
2Department of Entomology, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, West Central Research and Extension Center, North Platte, NE
3Department of Entomology, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Haskell Agricultural Laboratory, Concord, NE

Abstract

Interview with Débora Montezano

Thumbnail of Débora Montezano poster. Links to larger image.

2. Automated monitoring traps for detection of western bean cutworm (Striacosta albicosta)

Scott B. Williams, Chad Aeschliman, and Johnny Park Spensa Technologies, West Lafayette, IN

Abstract

Interview with Scott Williams

Thumbnail of Scott Williams poster. Links to larger image.

3. Western bean cutworm feeding damage on Bt hybrids and implications for economic injury levels

Katharine A. Swoboda Bhattarai1, Westen R. Archibald1,2, Douglas B. Jones3, Robert J. Wright4, and Julie A. Peterson1
1Department of Entomology, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, West Central Research and Extension Center, North Platte, NE
2Current affiliation: Medical Service Corp, US Navy, Norfolk, VA
3Monsanto Company, Lincoln, NE
4Department of Entomology, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, NE

Abstract

Thumbnail of Scott Williams poster. Links to larger image.

4. What is going on with the western bean cutworm on corn in Mexico?

Sergio R. Sanchez-Peña, Moisés Felipe-Victoriano, and Renato Villegas-Luján
Universidad Autónoma Agraria Antonio Narro, Saltillo, Mexico

Abstract

Interview with Sergio Sánchez-Peña

Sanchez-Pena Poster

5. Screening of entomopathogenic fungi from West Central Nebraska against key pests of corn

Camila Oliveira-Hofman1, Lance J. Meinke1, Anthony O. Adesemoye2, and J. A. Peterson3
1Department of Entomology, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, NE
2Department of Plant Pathology, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, West Central Research and Extension Center, North Platte, NE
3Department of Entomology, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, West Central Research and Extension Center, North Platte, NE

Thumbnail of presentation poster. Links to larger image.

6. Flight of the western bean cutworm: population patterns of a noctuid pest over the past 30 years

Priscila M. Colombo da Luz1, Katharine A. Swoboda Bhattarai1, Débora G. Montezano2, T. E. Hunt3, R. J. Wright2, and Julie A. Peterson1
1Department of Entomology, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, West Central Research and Extension Center, North Platte, NE
2Department of Entomology, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, NE
3Department of Entomology, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Haskell Agricultural Laboratory, Concord, NE

Abstract

Thumbnail of presentation poster. Links to larger image.

7. Improving degree-day models for the flight phenology of western bean cutworm (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae)

Anthony A. Hanson1, Roger D. Moon1, Robert J. Wright2, Thomas E. Hunt3, and William D. Hutchison1
1Department of Entomology, University of Minnesota, St Paul, MN
2Department of Entomology, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, NE
3Department of Entomology, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Haskell Agricultural Laboratory, Concord, NE

Abstract

Hanson Poster

8. Differences in midgut gene expression between Bt exposed and unexposed Western bean cutworm

Brad S. Coates1, Sarah N. Zukoff2, Thomas E. Hunt3, and Julie A. Peterson4
1USDA-ARS, Corn Insects & Crop Genetics Research Unit, Ames, IA
2Department of Entomology, Kansas State University, Southwest Research and Extension Center, Garden City, KS
3Department of Entomology, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Haskell Agricultural Laboratory, Concord, NE
4Department of Entomology, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, West Central Research and Extension Center, North Platte, NE

Abstract

Thumbnail of presentation poster. Links to larger image.

9. Characterizing larval movement of western bean cutworm in field maize

Thiago L. M. Fanela1, Débora G. Montezano2, Julie A. Peterson3, and Thomas E. Hunt4
1Department of Plant Production, São Paulo State University, São Paulo, Brazil
2Department of Entomology, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, NE
3Department of Entomology, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, West Central Research and Extension Center, North Platte, NE
4Department of Entomology, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Haskell Agricultural Laboratory, Concord, NE

Abstract

Interview with Tom Hunt

Fanela Poster

 

10. Nebraska growers’ and crop consultants’ knowledge and implementation of IPM of western bean cutworm

Westen R. Archibald1,2, Jeffrey D. Bradshaw3, Douglas A. Golick1, Robert J. Wright1, and Julie A. Peterson4
1Department of Entomology, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln NE
2Current affiliation: Medical Service Corp, US Navy, Norfolk, VA
3 Department of Entomology, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Panhandle Research and Extension Center, Scottsbluff, NE
4Department of Entomology, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, West Central Research and Extension Center, North Platte, NE

Abstract

Thumbnail of presentation poster. Links to larger image.

11. Integrated pest management and the role of spiders within Nebraska agroecosystems

Samantha R. Daniel1, Robert J. Wright1, and Julie A. Peterson2
1Department of Entomology, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln NE
2Department of Entomology, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, West Central Research and Extension Center, North Platte, NE

Abstract

Interview with Samantha Daniel

Thumbnail of presentation poster. Links to larger image.

12. The status of western bean cutworm, Striacosta albicosta (Smith), in New York State

Ken Wise1, Marion Zuefle1, Dan Olmstead1, Ryan Parker1, Keith Waldron1, and Carol MacNeil2
1NYS IPM Program, Cornell University, Geneva, NY
2Cornell Vegetable Program, CCE Ontario County, Canandaigua, NY

Abstract

Interview with Ken Wise & Marion Zuefle

Thumbnail of presentation poster. Links to larger image.

13. Trichogramma ostriniae takes on a new challenge: Western bean cutworm, an invasive pest in New York

Abby J. Seaman1 and Jeffrey Gardner2
1New York State Integrated Pest Management Program, Cornell University, New York State Agricultural Experiment Station, Geneva, NY
2Department of Entomology, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY

Abstract

Interview with Abby Seaman

Extension Materials Session

1. Introduction to the Handy Bt Trait Table

The Handy Bt Trait Table (authored by Chris DiFonzo of Michigan State University, Pat Porter of Texas A&M University, and Kelley Tilmon of The Ohio State University) lists the types of Bt traits present in all of the corn hybrids sold in the United States. The table includes the trade names of hybrids with Bt traits, Bt event, protein(s) expressed, herbicide traits, and target insect species.

2. Introduction to Scouting and Making Treatment Decisions for WBC

Scouting for WBC egg masses (composed of white, dome-shaped eggs) should begin when the first adults are caught. Control decisions should be made shortly after the moth flight peaks, which is usually in early to mid-July. Several resources are available to help you effectively scout for WBC egg masses and to make treatment decisions.

3. Introduction to the WBC NebGuide

This NebGuide from UN-L Extension addresses the life cycle, scouting, and treatment of WBC in corn and dry beans.