About Entomology

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Jim Kalisch

Entomology is the study of insects and encompasses the biological, agricultural, and environmental sciences related to insects and their interaction with humans and other organisms. Entomologists make contributions to such diverse fields as agriculture, chemistry, biology, human/animal health, molecular science, and forensics. The study of insects serves as the basis for developments in biological and chemical pest control, pharmaceuticals, food production and storage, mapping biological diversity, robotics, and other fields of science.

Professional entomologists work to detect the role of insects in the spread of disease and discover ways of protecting food crops and livestock from insect damage. Amateur entomologists are interested in insects because of the beauty and diversity of these creatures.

Entomology is an ancient science. There are early references to the use of insects in daily life, such as the growing of silkworms that began 4700 BC in China as early as 4000 BC. More than a hundred years ago, entomologists formed the Entomological Society of America (ESA), to promote the science and study of entomology in the United States.

What careers are available in Entomology? Career opportunities for our graduates include: federal government agencies (EPA, USDA, APHIS); state departments of agriculture, state agricultural research stations, university extension services, agrichemical companies, agricultural consulting firms, private agribusiness firms, seed production companies, and international development agencies. Students with an interest in urban entomology have career opportunities as pest control operators, in mosquito abatement districts and the food processing industry, in public health services, as industrial pest control consultants, and with the armed forces. Many of our students go on to pursue Master’s and PhD degrees either here or at other top-rated universities.

 

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